An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living Dad | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

//An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living Dad | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living Dad | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living DadGEORGE CAMERON ROMERO12:00 AM JUN 23, 2005I was born here in 1972, just a little late to have been around for the initial craze that hit the film industry straight out of Pittsburgh only a few years earlier. I was, however, lucky enough to have been born George Cameron Romero. Of course, it wasn’t until many years later that I actually realized what the man I was named after had done for the city of Pittsburgh.My father had a simple vision more than 30 years ago when he and a group of fellow Pittsburghers made a little film called “Night of the Living Dead.” He wanted to create a film that could lend a voice to the endless rants and viewpoints on the turbulent times that must have been swirling around his head. Somehow he ended up doing that through zombies.Who knew that this movie produced on a shoestring budget and originally slated for drive-ins would put Pittsburgh back on the map, this time for inventing a new genre of film? How cool is that? Anyway, he continued on to make two more films that shocked and terrified his audience, “Dawn of the Dead” and “Day of the Dead.”Even as smaller filmmakers as well as not-so-small filmmakers began to take a page from my father’s book when it came to their style, it seemed that people continued to appreciate his particular style and tone of zombie flicks. Each new zombie film he did grew more insanely popular that the last with what appeared to be one of the most devout fan bases I’ve ever seen. He continued on to make countless other amazing films such as “Creepshow,” “The Dark Half,” “Monkey Shines” and my personal favorite, “The Crazies.”Now, more than 30 years after “Night of the Living Dead,” which has been written about in academic journals, discussed on PBS documentaries and given a home in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry, George Romero has gotten the opportunity to make a script that he has carried around in his head for a long time. He would very much like to have made the film in Pittsburgh, but, despite the good efforts of many in this city, the current economics of Hollywood would not let it be so. But the early reviews are in, and both Variety and the Hollywood Reporter have raved about this film, which though its budget is small by Hollywood standards, is the largest my father has had to work with. Variety predicted a killer box office and the Hollywood Reporter called it a “masterpiece.”Few people realize the exhaustive work that goes into making a movie. I remember sitting on the couch with him watching his first cut of the raw footage. CGI had yet to be added, and there was a temp soundtrack. Since I’d seen many films at this stage, this was nothing strange to me. His descriptions of what was to be added digitally as the film went on sent chills down my spine. And, in true George A. Romero style, even to me, he was tearing apart every shot, second-guessing himself. … “If we would have shot from THIS angle, it could have been better.”Although the film was made in Toronto, I was thrilled when I had heard that through the efforts of Bernie Goldmann and Ellen Kander and Carl Kurlander of the Steeltown Entertainment Project, which has been trying to help Pittsburgh develop its talent base in the movie business, Universal had agreed to last night’s Pittsburgh premiere to benefit young filmmakers here. I also was excited when I was given the opportunity to participate through the marketing and PR firm of which I am part, CAMOP, to make it the largest film premiere Pittsburgh has ever seen.Before I knew it, the premiere snowballed and took on a life of its own. I spent the last week on the phone with Greg Nicotero from KNB EFX Group, Inc. (and a hometown-boy-made-good in L.A. who has done makeup and special effects on more than 500 movies from “Sin City” to “Dances With Wolves”) trying to arrange for some of the people who have been influenced by my father to get to Pittsburgh for this event.In closing, I’d like to say thank-you to my father. Thank you for doing something nobody had ever done before, and thank you for becoming such an icon in Pittsburgh’s already rich history. Thank you for being a champion of bringing filmmaking back to this city (even if it didn’t work out this time).Last night’s event was symbolic of something I’ve been trying to tell you for years, but that I never quite figured out how to say quite the right way.I hope you realize how much we (Pittsburgh) really do love you and what you’ve done.I love you, Dad.George Cameron Romero

Source: An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living Dad | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

By | 2017-11-03T23:55:01+00:00 June 23rd, 2005|George A. Romero|Comments Off on An open letter to Pittsburgh from George Romero’s son: Night of the Living Dad | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette